Ginger Sin at the Art of Contemporary Shibari Exhibit

We had a great time during the Opening weekend for the Art of Contemporary Shibari Exhibit in Houston. I rigged Ginger Sin with helpful suggestions by Lew Rubens. CapturedErotica photographed this image. These are absolutely wonderful people to work with and have as friends. I’m blessed.

(Click on the image to see a higher resolution image.)

Skye Greene in an early suspension

This shoot with Sky Geene was her first experience with ropes and shibari.  Here she is suspended in an inverted hog tie.  In a normal upright position, a hog tie is a classic shibari position.  Skye liked her experience and we created many beautiful images together in this and other shibari photoshoots.

(Click on the image to expand it.)

Featured Print: Dec 16, 2011 – Jamie Syring Light Sculptured Ballet

This is one of my favorite images from my shoot with Jamie Syring,  which included bodyscapes, “floor work” ballet positions and shibari suspensions with ballet positions.

We wanted to create a light sculptured look.

This Featured Print is available here.

Other prints from this shoot are available here.

Some of my other favorite images from this shoot are included in this video, Ballet Dancer.

Skye Greene – June 2011

Skye Greene and I did a gold body paint shoot.  We wanted to create some gold statue type poses.  Skye was awesome.  She got right into the “role” and gracefully moved from one awesome pose to another.  What a pleasure it is to work with a professional.

We also did some relatively simple shibari rigging and suspensions that were no-where near as aggressive as some of the others Skye and I have done together.  But, I painted my ropes gold too, so Skye and the ropes together look like a statue.  The pictures look great.  I still have editing to do on them.  When I finish, I’ll include them both in a future post and in the following gallery.

Gallery

Shiloh – May 2011

Shiloh paid us a visit for a photoshoot.  Besides the fun times we had posing and doing suspensions, we had a kick shooting images for a video, which will be the subject of a future blog post.  ( I need to find time to edit and create the video.)

In the meantime, enjoy some of the images from our shoot.

Gallery

(Click on the link to view these images on your full screen.)

Shibari – a brief description …

In Japanese, “Shibari” simply means “to tie”. The contemporary meaning of Shibari describes an ancient Japanese artistic form of rope bondage.

The origin of Shibari comes from Hojo-jutsu, the martial art of restraining captives. In Japan from 1400 to 1700, while the local police and Samurai used Hojo-jutsu as a form of imprisonment and torture, the honor of these ancient Samurai warriors required them to treat their prisoners well. So, they used different techniques to tie their prisoners, showing the honor and status of their captured prisoner.

In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s a new form of erotic Hojo-justu evolved, called Kinbaku, the art of erotic bondage. Today, particularly in the west, the art of erotic bondage is typically called Shibari, which is an art of erotic spirituality, not a martial art.

Shibari style rigging creates geometric patterns and shapes with rope that contrast beautifully with the human body’s natural curves. The ropes and their texture provide contrast to smooth skin and curves. In Shibari, the model is the canvas, the rope is the paint and brush, and the rigger is the rope artist.

The aesthetic arrangement of ropes and knots on the model’s body in Shibari rigging emphasizes characteristics like sensuality, vulnerability, and also strength. The positioning of knots in appropriate places stimulates pressure points on the body, very similarly to acupuncture techniques and Shiatsu, a form of Japanese massage. Some believe a Shibari experience also stimulates Ki energy flow and transfer.

In addition to creating beautiful patterns, with rope, body and limb placements, Shibari rigging induces physiological conditions known as “sub space” and “top space”, which are similar to the “runners high” experienced by athletes. A Shibari experience results in an increased level of endorphins and other hormones, creating a trance-like experience for the bottom/model and an adrenaline rush for the Top/rigger. When a Shibari scene is performed with appropriate ambience, these effects are actually visible in the face of the model. The term “rope drunk” is sometimes affectionately used to describe the euphoric condition of the model after a Shibari experience.

For most practitioners of Shibari, the use of rope bondage does not include an unwilling victim like the “Damsels in Distress” images popular in Detective type magazines. Instead, there is a collaboration between the Shibari artist (the rigger/Top) and the Shibari canvas (the model/bottom) to create a combination of effects including visual beauty, power exchange, helplessness, relaxation, and sub space and top space physiological experiences.

Contemporary practitioners of Shibari enjoy creating beautiful still images, live and recorded performance art. Shibari can also be used as a component in BDSM play and an enhancement in sexual activities.